January is widely regarded as "divorce month," and for good reason. More divorces are filed in January than any other month.

More divorces after the holidays(Photo: Thomas Northcut Getty Images)

In fact, there's such a spike in divorce filings after the holidays, professionals prepare themselves for the boom. Divorce lawyer James Gross of law firm Thyden, Gross & Callahan told YourTango:

"Some attorneys take the last two weeks of the year off to get ready for the rush. January really does see a lot of divorces."

Ginita Wall organizes a divorce workshop in Los Angeles. She told NBCLA that she sees a surge in attendees between January and March:

"People somehow expect the job of the season is going to correct a troubled marriage," Wall says. "And it never does."

Other experts speculate that holiday stress pushes relationships to their breaking point. Tax considerations may also have couples postponing their divorce until the New Year.

Divorce consultant Cathy Meyer explains:

"There may be more divorces than ever in January because some unhappy people have been putting divorce off during the downturn simply because they could not afford it."

Psychotherapist and divorce expert Mel Schwartz would agree. He told The Heart Beat:

"Divorce is far less a stigma than it used to be. However, the current economic conditions may force many people to remain unhappily married due to financial constraints."

But as the New Year approaches, those financial constraints might seem less important than a fresh start.

"Divorce should not be considered unless each person can say they have individually done all they can reasonably do," Schwartz adds. "Have they looked into themselves, have they worked on communications skills, have they engaged in therapy?"

With January looming, many couples will feel they've done everything they can reasonably do. For them, the New Year will also mean a new status and a new start.

Photo: Thomas Northcut/Getty Images