Questionnaires and daily diary entries showed that fathers in particular expressed greater levels of happiness than men without children, says S. Katherine Nelson, lead study author and a doctoral candidate at University of California, Riverside. (For more dad-approved health tips and breaking news, sign up for the Men's Health Dads newsletter.)

But if you don't have a mini-you following you around, here are three things that bring just as much satisfaction and meaning to your day-to-day routine. (Bonus: No dirty diapers involved.)

Your Social Network
"The greatest predictor of life satisfaction is your social support network," says Shawn Achor, M.S., author of The Happiness Advantage and founder of Good Think Inc. And while that social network could consist of children, it could also be friends, family members, and coworkers. "So if you want to enjoy your life, you have to create social investment," says Achor. Translation: Stop being a stranger. Even if you're not typically the initiator, be the guy who holds the weekly poker night at his place, or the one to pick up the phone to catch up with a family member.

Your Busy Agenda
People are more satisfied when they invest in life experiences rather than splurge on material possessions, according to research from the University of Colorado at Boulder. Researchers asked more than 12,000 people to name an experience and a material purchase that they made in order to increase their happiness. And when it came to choosing which made them happier and more satisfied, the majority sided with life experiences. Why? The researchers hypothesize that these experiences contribute more to successful social relationships and leave you with more positive memories. (Need some inspiration for your next road trip? Book 20 Guy Trips That Will Change Your Life.)

Your Hard Work
Your job may suck up a lot of your time, but showing up every day can lead to greater feelings of satisfaction, according to recent data from the Pew Research Center. Researchers analyzed the differences in satisfaction between adults who have a degree versus those who don't, as well as employed and unemployed adults. Although employment was often linked to happiness and satisfaction, the findings show that college grads who worked full time were the most satisfied with their careers and believed their 9-to-5 life contributed to their overall happiness. The researchers hypothesize this sense of fulfillment comes from doing an activity that makes you feel like you have a purpose. (If you're not content with your current gig, learn how to Find a New Job--Without Applying.)